For the Public

Print Resources

Proper care and maintenance of your family heirlooms and works of art will ensure that they are available for future generations to enjoy. To help you better care for your personal heritage, we have developed these guides for caring for you treasures.

  • Caring for Architecture
    This brochure addresses concerns and questions you might have about a structure for which you are responsible.
  • Caring for Books
    A few simple preventive measures can greatly extend the life of a book.
  • Caring for Home Videotape
    Videotape is fragile—subject to damage and deterioration from exposure to poor environmental conditions and inadequate handling practices. Even if properly cared for as outlined, magnetic tape may last for only a few decades.
  • Caring for Ceramic and Glass Objects
    A guide for caring for porcelain, earthenware, “crystal,” pottery, art glass, jewelry, dolls, sculpture, tableware, tiles, kitchenware, and other items made from ceramics and glass.
  • Caring for Metal Objects
    Learn to care for tools, jewelry, toys, sculpture, tableware, furniture, kitchenware, and almost any other item that can be made from metal.
  • Caring for Photographs
    The prevalence of photographs allows us to forget that they are potentially fragile objects that can be easily damaged by careless handling, improper storage, and exposure to environmental influences such as light, humidity, and temperature.
  • Caring for Paintings
    Paintings are fragile creations that require special care to ensure their continued preservation.
  • Caring for Paper
    Documents, manuscripts, and works of art on paper such as prints, drawings, and watercolors are inherently fragile but can be easily and effectively protected from damage.
  • Caring for Textiles
    Making careful and informed decisions regarding the handling, display, and storage of a textile can make the difference between a short life span and a textile’s preservation for future generations.
  • Matting and Framing Works of Art and Artifacts on Paper
    Works of art and documents on paper are also susceptible to chemical damage by components in paperboard and adhesives used to mat works of art and documents. The purpose of this brochure is to provide information about recommended materials for matting and framing and to indicate those materials to avoid.

Videos

The National Center for Preservation Technology and Training (NCPTT) and the Foundation for Advancement in Conservation (FAIC) partnered to present a series of online resources that provide sound recovery practices for cultural heritage. The target audience for these training events includes staff in small museums responsible for collections care, as well as homeowners and collectors.

  • Wet Recovery of Paper and Books
    The first webinar in the series is "Wet Recovery of Paper and Books" presented by Karen Pavelka from UT Austin School of Information.
  • Wet Recovery of Taxidermy
    The webinar "Wet Recovery of Taxidermy" was presented by Fran Ritchie and Julia Sybalsky from American Museum of Natural History.