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  • TechFocus IV: Caring for 3D-printed Art

    Contains 3 Component(s) Includes Multiple Live Events. The next is on 10/25/2021 at 11:00 AM (EDT)

    October 25, 27, & 29, 2021 11:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. EDT, online

    October 25, 27, & 29, 2021 at 11:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. EDT
    Virtual symposium

    3D printing, also known as rapid prototyping or additive manufacturing, is being utilized by architects, designers, artists, and consumers, and is becoming increasingly common and technically sophisticated. In short, it describes the process of creating a three-dimensional object via computer-aided design (CAD) programs and digital files, printing it using a range of materials from plastic to metal more conventionally, to all kinds of experimental materials like chocolate or shrimp shells. Originated as a technology to rapidly produce prototypes, 3D-printed artworks are now progressively entering collections. While long-term condition prognosis still awaits discovery, some printing materials are known to quickly yellow and degrade. At the same time, the inherent reproducibility of the technology challenges us to rethink appropriate preservation measures for cases where the boundaries of what constitutes the “original object” may not be as clearly defined.

    The goal of this program is to address caretakers and creators alike and help them understand these objects’ technology, risks, and requirements. In this way, the virtual symposium will serve as a platform to develop guidelines within the community towards the long-term stewardship of both the printed object and accompanying digital files necessary if reprinting becomes a viable option.

    Participants who register by September 1 will receive a complimentary 3D-print sample set in the mail (international participants must pay a $10 shipping fee here to receive the sample set).

    A $75 student registration fee is available for current students. Please send a message with your student ID to learning@culturalheritage.org to register at the student rate.

    The live virtual symposium will take place on Zoom and automated live captions will be available for those who choose to use them. The program will be recorded and registrants will have access to the recordings following the live sessions.


    This program is being made possible by the generous support of the Foundation for Advancement in Conservation and a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. FAIC relies on your contributions to support these and its many other programs. Learn more about donating to the foundation here.

    The TechFocus workshop series is organized by the American Institute for Conservation’s Electronic Media Group to provide detailed technical education in the preservation of media art. Launched on the 10th anniversary of the groundbreaking TechArchaeology symposium that was held at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in 2000, TechFocus offers in-depth instruction in a broad range of media. Each workshop, hosted by a different institution, is dedicated to one specific media-art technology. A systematic lecture program, delivered by international experts, introduces workshop participants to the technology behind these artworks, and offers real-world guidelines for their preservation. The TechFocus website offers videos of presentations made at past workshops.

    Thank you to Martina Haidvogl, Emily Hamilton, and Alexandra Nichols for their work in planning this program.

    Paola Antonelli

    Senior Curator, Department of Architecture & Design

    The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)

    Paola Antonelli is Senior Curator at The Museum of Modern Art in the Department of Architecture & Design, as well as MoMA’s founding Director of Research & Development. Her most recent exhibition, Broken Nature, opened at MoMA in November 2020. She is also currently working on @design.emergency, an Instagram and book project  explores design’s role in building a better future>span class="gmaildefault"> for all, in collaboration with critic Alice Rawsthorn. 

    Sarah Barack

    Head of Conservation and Senior Objects Conservator

    Head of Conservation and Senior Objects Conservator

    Sarah Barack is the Head of Conservation and Senior Objects Conservator at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum. She holds a Masters of Art and Certificate of Advanced Conservation from the Conservation Center, Institute of Fine Arts, New York University and a Masters of Business Administration from Columbia Business School. Recent research has ranged from plastics polishing protocols to technical study of 18th Century European porcelain. She served for four years as Treasurer for the American Institute of Conservation/Foundation for the Advancement in Conservation and is the co-founder and co-chair of the AIC K-12 Outreach Working Group.

    Savannah Campbell

    Video and Digital Media Preservation Specialist

    Whitney Museum of American Art

    Savannah Campbell is a Video and Digital Media Preservation Specialist at the WhitneyMuseum of American Art. She has previously been a Fellow in Magnetic MediaPreservation at The Standby Program and has worked on audiovisual preservationprojects for the Dance Heritage Coalition, CUNY TV, and Crawford MediaServices. Savannah holds an MA in Moving Image Archiving and Preservation fromNew York University.

    Olivia Chow

    Assistant Curator, Visual Art

    M+

    Olivia Chow isAssistant Curator, Visual Art, at M+, the new museum of visual culture in HongKong’s West Kowloon Cultural District. She participated in the curatorialprocess for the M+ exhibitions Shirley Tse: Stakeholders, Hong Kong inVenice (2019), Hong Kong’s presence at the 58th Venice Biennale, and ShirleyTse: Stakes and Holders (2020). Before joining M+, she held variouscuratorial positions at Para Site (Hong Kong) and at The Works Art and DesignFestival (Edmonton). At Para Site, she edited The Unappropriated Recipes,an unconventional cookbook that responds to Hong Kong through contributionsfrom artists, curators, and collaborators in the local and international artcommunity.

    ​Carolien Coon

    SEAHA doctoral student

    UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage

    Carolien Coon is a SEAHA doctoral student at UCL Institute for Sustainable Heritage investigating the stability of Additive Manufactured plastics. At UCL she obtained an MRes in Heritage Science (2015) and worked as Research Assistant on the Horizon 2020 project NANORESTART: Nanomaterials for the restoration of works of art. Previously, Coon obtained a Fine Art degree from Central University of Technology, Free State, South Africa (1999) and a BA (Hons) in Conservation at City and Guilds of London Art School (2009). As conservator she has worked for the National Trust, Plowden and Smith Ltd. and the Victoria and Albert Museum. 

    ​Margo Delidow

    Assistant Conservator

    Whitney Museum of American Art

    Margo Delidow, Assistant Conservator for the Whitney Museum of American Art, completed a Masters of Arts and Certificate of Advanced Study in Conservation from The Art Conservation Program at Buffalo State, The State University of New York. She is a partner at Whryta Contemporary Art Conservation and a Professional Associate Member of AIC.

    ​Llisa Demetrios

    Chief Curator

    Eames Collection

    Llisa Demetrios has been archiving the material from the Eames Office at 901 Washington in Los Angeles for over twenty-five years. Most recently, she facilitated the loans for "The World of Charles & Ray Eames" exhibition that started at the Barbican Centre in England in 2015 and continued to Sweden, Portugal, Belgium, Germany, Michigan, and the Oakland Museum of California in February 2019. Demetrios loves how a single object can tell a larger story of how her grandparents, Charles & Ray Eames, approached the problems of their day, like sustainability and conservation, which can help us face similar challenges today.

    ​Charlotte Eng

    Conservator

    Private Practice

    Charlotte Eng has a PhD in materials science and engineering from Stony Brook University, NY. She was previously a Senior Conservation Scientist at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) where she used noninvasive and micro-invasive methods to examine diverse works of art from LACMA's collection. Projects she enjoyed working on included materials identification of contemporary jewelry, use of spectroradiometry for the evaluation of light sources to be used to illuminate artworks, and preservation issues of 3D printed objects.  Currently, she is a staff scientist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the Chemical and Isotopic Signatures Group of the Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division.

    ​Alessandra Guarascio

    Conservator, Installation Art

    M+

    Alessandra Guarascio is the Conservator, Installation Art, at M+ in Hong Kong. As part of the conservation team, she is responsible for the day-to-day care and documentation of the installation art collection. She obtained her master’s degree in Conservation of Contemporary Art in Milan, with a thesis on the documentation and rearrangement of a complex installation by John Bock. Prior to her current appointment, she collaborated with the Museo del Novecento, Hangar Bicocca, and the Museo del Design Italiano in Milan. In 2013 she moved to Singapore, where she spent six years working on all phases of conservation at the ArtScience Museum and National Gallery Singapore.

    Martina Haidvogl (Moderator)

    Lecturer in Conservation of Contemporary Art

    Bern University of the Arts

    Martina Haidvogl is a lecturer in Conservation ofContemporary Art at the Bern University of the Arts. Prior to this appointment,she was Associate Media Conservator at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art(2011-2019), where she has piloted documentation and preservation initiativesfor SFMOMA’s Media Arts collection. Haidvogl has lectured and publishedinternationally on media conservation and its implementation within collectinginstitutions. Her research focuses on cross-disciplinary collaboration practicefostered through digital tools, serving the needs of the art of our time.

    Emily Hamilton

    Assistant Professor of Objects Conservation

    SUNY Buffalo State College

    Emily Hamilton is the Assistant Professor ofObjects Conservation at Buffalo State College. Previously, she was theAssociate Objects Conservator at SFMOMA, Assistant Objects Conservator at theSaint Louis Art Museum, and the Samuel H. Kress Sculpture and MediaConservation Research Fellow at MoMA. Hamilton earned a B.A. in Art Historyfrom Reed College and an M.A. in Art Conservation from SUNY Buffalo StateCollege.

    Mark Hellar

    Mark Hellar is a technology consultant for cultural institutions and the owner of Hellar Studios LLC. He specializes in innovative yet practical digital media and software-based solutions for multimedia artists and institutions that support their work, with an emphasis on developing systems for exhibition, documentation, and preservation. Hellar is currently working on new media conservation initiatives at SFMOMA, including the conservation and care of their software-based artworks. He is also the software developer for the studio of artist Lynn Hershman Leeson and faculty at the San Francisco Art Institute, teaching on the topics of virtual reality and augmented reality.

    ​Sriba Kwadjovie Quintana, J.D.

    Intellectual Property Manager

    San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA)

    Sriba Kwadjovie Quintana, J.D., currently serves as the Intellectual Property Manager at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), where she manages copyright and assesses compliance with intellectual property laws and policies affecting the museum’s operation, exhibition programming, events and publications. She has presented on matters involving IP and the arts for the American Bar Association, Western Museums Association and at Stanford University. Kwadjovie Quintana is also a trained dancer and has performed with various modern/contemporary dance companies throughout the Bay Area.

    Nic Lee

    Research Assistant

    MIT Media Lab

    Nic Lee is a computational designer at the MIT Media Lab. His researchcombines design, digital fabrication, material development and energyevaluation in order to create end to end pipelines for sustainableconstruction. Through his work, he aims to bridge the gap between grown andbuilt environments. Lee graduated from the University of Virginia withbachelor’s degrees in biomedical engineering and neuroscience and received hisMDes from the Harvard Graduate School of Design. In 2020, he received his MASat the Mediated Matter Group and he is currently a PhD candidate at the MITMedia Lab.

    Nic Lee

    Research Assistant

    MIT Media Lab

    Nic Lee is a computational designer at the MIT Media Lab. His researchcombines design, digital fabrication, material development and energyevaluation in order to create end to end pipelines for sustainableconstruction. Through his work, he aims to bridge the gap between grown andbuilt environments. Lee graduated from the University of Virginia withbachelor’s degrees in biomedical engineering and neuroscience and received hisMDes from the Harvard Graduate School of Design. In 2020, he received his MASat the Mediated Matter Group and he is currently a PhD candidate at the MITMedia Lab.

    ​Daniel Luetolf

    CL-Y GmbH Zurich

    Daniel Luetolf lives and works in Zurich. In 2001 he obtained a degree in structural engineering in Zurich and 2010 a MSc ETH Zurich in architecture.  From 2010 to 2016, he was an art producer for Urs Fischer in New York and Zurich. In 2016, he founded his own company CL-Y GmbH for 3D art production which is realizing national and international projects in art and architecture. He has been researching and teaching at the ETH Zurich since 2016. Furthermore, he is a member of the art collective CKÖ and winner of the 2014 Swiss Art Award.

    Alexandra Nichols (Moderator)

    Time-Based Media Conservator

    Tate

    Alexandra Nichols is a Time-Based Media Conservator at Tate, focusing on exhibitions and displays. Prior to working at Tate, she was a Sherman Fairchild Foundation Fellow at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and a Samuel H. Kress Fellow at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York concentrating on the conservation of time-based media. Alexandra Nichols holds an M.S. in Art Conservation from the Winterthur/University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation and a B.A. in Art History from the University of Maryland.

    ​Peter Oleksik

    Associate Media Conservator

    Museum of Modern Art (MoMA)

    Peter Oleksik is Associate Media Conservator at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) where he has been working since 2011 to conserve the museum's vast time-based media collection across curatorial departments. Outside of MoMA, Oleksik regularly writes and teaches various topics within time-based media conservation as well as works with artists, filmmakers and musicians to preserve and provide access to their media collections. Oleksik received his BA in Cinema Studies from the University of Southern California and his MA from New York University’s Moving Image Archiving and Preservation (MIAP) program.

    ​Daniel Ostroff

    Consultant

    Eames Office

    Daniel Ostroff has worked with the Eames Office since 2006, during which time he has written 300 blog posts on various aspects of the work of Charles and Ray Eames. Since 2001, he has also advised institutions and private companies, including the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Victoria and Albert Museum, Vitra Design Museum, Bonham’s Auctioneers, The Cummins Foundation, Herman Miller, Gillett and Caudana Appraisers, and J. F. Chen Ltd. Ostroff was the editor of An Eames Anthology: Articles, Film Scripts, Interviews, Letters, Notes and Speeches by Charles and Ray Eames (Yale University Press) and is active as a film and television producer.

    ​Megan Randall

    Objects Conservator

    Midwest Art Conservation Center (MACC)

    Megan Randall is an Objects Conservator at the Midwest Art Conservation Center (MACC) in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Prior to MACC, Randall was an Associate Objects Conservator at the Museum of Modern Art. She earned her graduate degree at the Conservation Center, Institute of Fine Arts, NYU, and completed internships at the Chinati Foundation in Marfa, Texas and the American Museum of Natural History. Prior to entering the field of conservation she worked as a finisher at Modern Art Foundry in Astoria, Queens. She received a master’s degree from Christie's Education in 2008 and a bachelor’s degree from Carleton College.

    Virginia San Fratello

    Partner

    Rael San Fratello and Emerging Objects

    Virginia San Fratello draws, builds, 3D prints, teaches,and writes about architecture and interior design as a cultural endeavor deeplyinfluenced by craft traditions and contemporary technologies. She is a foundingpartner in the Oakland, CA based make-tank Emerging Objects and the co-authorof PrintingArchitecture: Innovative Recipes for 3D Printing (PrincetonArchitectural Press 2018), a book that reexamines the building process from thebottom up and offers illuminating case studies for 3D printing with materialslike chardonnay grape skins, salt and sawdust. Her work has been publishedwidely, including in the New YorkTimes, and is recognized by several institutions including: LACMA, TheNational Building Museum and included in the permanent collection of The Museumof Modern Art in New York, The Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum, The SanFrancisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Design Museum in London.

    ​Sarah Scaturro

    Eric and Jane Nord Chief Conservator

    Cleveland Museum of Art

    Sarah Scaturro is the Eric and Jane Nord Chief Conservator at the Cleveland Museum of Art. From 2012 - 2020 she was the Head Conservator of the Costume Institute, Metropolitan Museum of Art, where she developed a materials-and values-based approach to the conservation of fashion that foregrounds fashion as a time-based phenomenon. Previously, Scaturro was the Textile Conservator and Assistant Curator of Fashion at the Cooper-Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum. She graduated with an MA from the Fashion Institute of Technology in Fashion & Textile Studies and is a PhD candidate at Bard Graduate Center, researching the history of costume conservation.

    ​Jill Sterrett

    Independent Arts and Cultural Advisor

    Jill Sterrett is an arts and cultural advisor. She was Interim Director and Deputy Director at the Smart Museum of Art at the University of Chicago (2018-2020) and Director of Collections and Art Conservator at the San Francisco Museum of Art (1990-2018). She is engaged in ways to revitalize museums for our times and plays an active role in Voices in Contemporary Art, an international consortium of conservators, curators, collectors, educators, and students who recognize the need for new forms of collaboration. She has lived and practiced on four continents and believes this business of objects has always been about people. 

    Shirley Tse

    Artist

    Shirley Tse works in the mediums of sculpture,installation, photography, and text. She deconstructs the world of syntheticobjects that carry paradoxical meanings, while constructing models in whichdifferences might come together. Tse’s work has been exhibited extensively inthe US and internationally in the last 20 years. She represented Hong Kong atthe 58th Venice Biennale. Her work is featured in numerous publications including‘Akademie X: Lessons in Art + Life’ (2015), ‘Sculpture Today’ (2007), andothers. Tse received the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowshipin 2009. She has been on the faculty at California Institute of the Arts(CalArts) since 2001.

    Jessica Walthew

    Objects Conservator

    Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum

    Jessica Walthew is an objects conservator atCooper Hewitt, working with both the Product Design & Decorative arts andDigital collections. Her research interests include the history and theory ofconservation, and technical research, especially with imaging technologies. Hercurrent work focuses on plastics (both their conservation and culturalhistory). She served as co-curator of Natural Plastics (2019) at Cooper Hewittand is currently researching the use of bioplastics in design.

    Aga Wielocha

    Conservator, Preventive

    M+

    Aga Wielocha is a collection care professional and a researcher specialized in contemporary art. Currently, she holds a position of Conservator, Preventive at M+ in Hong Kong. She holds a PhD from the University of Amsterdam. Her doctoral research carried out within the program ‘New Approaches in the Conservation of Contemporary Art’ (NACCA), situated at the crossroads of art history and theory, conservation, museology, and heritage studies, is focused on the lives and futures of contemporary art in institutional collections, particularly on works which are variable and unfold over time. Prior to her doctoral studies, she served as a conservator at the Museum of Modern Art, Warsaw.

  • C2C Care Course: Building Collaborations Between Museums and Indigenous Communities

    Contains 8 Component(s) Includes Multiple Live Events. The next is on 10/21/2021 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    This course will walk participants through the process of building positive foundations of mutual respect and trust, essential to collaborative work

    Museums and indigenous communities are increasingly seeking to engage in collaborative working relationships. However, resources to help guide this work have been lacking. In response to this need, the Guidelines for Collaboration (www.guidelinesforcollaboration.info) was developed over a period of several years with the participation of over 50 Native and non-Native museum professionals, scholars, and artists. 

    With the Guidelines as the main reference, this course will walk participants through the process of building positive foundations of mutual respect and trust, essential to collaborative work. Topics will be co-presented by a diverse group of museum professionals and artists experienced in collaborative museum work. Further, course participants will learn how to adapt the Guidelines to their own work.

     As the conservation of cultural heritage continues to evolve toward a more humanist practice, the Guidelines for Collaboration offers a helpful reference. Sessions will allow time for questions and discussion.

    Upon completion of the course, participants will

    • Have the tools they need to successfully collaborate with Native communities
    • Understand how to adapt the Guidelines for Collaboration to their own work
    • Know how to document collaborative work
    • Have suggestions on where to turn for financial support for collaborative projects with Native communities

    Our Course Coordinator is Landis Smith, Co-facilitator, Guidelines for CollaborationIndian Arts Research Center, School for Advanced Research, Santa Fe, NM

    Course Schedule 

    Webinar 1: Why collaborate?  Building a foundation for working together. September 30, 2021 1:00pm-2:30pm ET 

    This course will begin with a brief introduction to the Indian Arts Research Center (IARC) at the School for Advanced Research (SAR), sponsor of the Guidelines for Collaboration. This opening session will then explore the benefits of collaborative work for conservation and stewardship of Indigenous collections.  Ideas for collaboration will be shared and discussed in a safe space to build trust and unityInstructors will facilitate a conversation about ways to collaborate, including identifying and reaching out to appropriate partners. 

    Webinar 2: Planning and implementing collaborative work.October 7, 2021 1:00pm-2:30pm ET

    Instructors will discuss the ways in which museums and communities can prepare for working together to help ensure positive outcomes. Topics will include how to create a welcoming environment, the importance of a flexible agenda and accommodating cultural needs and protocols. 

    Webinar 3: Critical considerations in building collaborations. October 14, 2021 1:00pm-2:30pm ET

    Instructors will discuss important considerations in collaborative work as well as ideas for indigenizing museum spaces and the integration of traditional care practices.

    Webinar 4: After the museum visit: Ongoing relationships; documentation of collaborative work. October 21, 2021 1:00pm-2:30pm ET

    Following museum collections visits by tribal community members, there is generally documentation of the visit as well as new information generated. Who owns this documentation, what are the respect and privacy issues? How should this documentation be maintained? 

    Webinar 5: Wrap-up Discussion and Funding. October 28, 2021 1:00-2:30pm ET

    This session is in two parts: 

    • Part 1: Funding opportunities and how to structure project proposals.
    • Part 2: Course wrap-up with questions and answers. 

    Early Registration Fee (on or before September 22): $99
    Standard Registration (after September 22): $149

    Course content will be delivered via Zoom webinar which will allow participants to view lectures and interact with course instructors via chat and a Question and Answer period. 

    Connecting to Collections Care courses are made possible in part by generous support from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

    Landis Smith (Moderator)

    Co-facilitator, Guidelines for Collaboration,

    Indian Arts Research Center, School for Advanced Research

    Landis Smith is an independent consultant and projects conservator based in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The focus of her work over thirty years has been on the development of conservation and documentation methodologies that are collaborative with Native American artists, elders, scholars and leaders. Recent work includes co-facilitating the development and web publication of the Guidelines for Collaboration (www.guidelinesforcollaboration.info) with the Indian Arts Research Center at the School for Advanced Research (SAR).  Landis is currently co-editing the Standards of Excellence for Museums with Native American Collections for the American Alliance of Museums and leading an IMLS-funded project to collaboratively document and conserve collections at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture in Santa Fe. Landis’s previous work includes organizing and leading “place-based” educational programs in New Mexico for NMAI Fellows and staff in collaboration with Native communities and tribal museums. She was Anchorage Project Conservator at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) Arctic Studies Center, working extensively with Alaska Native artists and elders. Landis has been a Research Associate with the National Museum of the American Indian and has served on several advisory boards including the Haak’u Museum at Acoma Pueblo and UCLA/Getty Mellon Opportunity for Diversity in Conservation.

    Kelly McHugh

    Conservator/Collections Manager

    National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian

    Kelly McHugh became the Head of Collections Care and Stewardship at the National Museum of the American Indian in 2018.  Previously, she served as an object conservator where she began working for the museum in 1996 at NMAI’s Research Branch facility in the Bronx, NY.  There she participated in a survey of the over 800,000 objects in the collection, prior to the collections move to the Cultural Resources Center in Maryland. As a conservator she played an active role in the development of collaborative conservation practices for the care of Native American collections.  She continues to broaden the scope of collaboration and partnership with the Museum’s constituency through collections access, cultural protocol policy and artistic revitilzation.  She received her MA Art History with a Certificate in Conservation from New York University, Institute of Fine Arts and her BA in Art History and Peace and Global Policy Studies again from New York University.

    Martina Dawley (Hualapai/Diné)

    Director

    Hualapai Department of Cultural Resources

    Dr. Martina Dawley is the Interim Director/THPO/Senior Archaeologist at the Hualapai Department of Cultural Resources (HDCR). Dr. Dawley received her Bachelor of Arts degree (2006) in Anthropology with a focus on Southwest archaeology, and Master of Arts degree (2009) and Doctoral degree (2013) in American Indian Studies (AIS) from the University of Arizona, with a focus on caring for ancestral remains and their belongings as it relates to repatriation and heritage preservation. Her dissertation focused on Native Americans in the field of conservation, which revealed that conservators are more likely to be non-Native.

    Melissa Shaginoff (Dena’ina)

    Curator/Artist

    Melissa Shaginoff, is part of the Udzisyu (caribou) and Cui Ui Ticutta (fish-eater) clans from Nay'dini'aa  Na Kayax (Chickaloon Village, Alaska). She is an Ahtna and Paiute person, an artist, a social activist, and  currently the curator of Alaska Pacific University’s Art Galleries. Her work is shaped by the structure and  processes of the Dene ceremony, potlatch. Melissa has participated in the Island Mountain Arts Toni  Onley Artist Project in Wells, British Columbia as well as the Sheldon Jackson Museum Artist Residency  in Sitka, Alaska. She has been published in the Alaska Humanities FORUM Magazine, First American Art  Magazine, Inuit Art Quarterly, and the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Learning Lab. Her artwork is  collected by the Institute of American Indian Arts, the Palmer Museum and the Pratt Museum. Melissa  is also a part of Łuk’ae Tse’ Tsass (fish head soup) Comics, a new media group focusing on the collaboration and representation of Indigenous experiences in science-fiction. Later this year Melissa will participate in two international residencies. One in Canada with Jenni House of the Yukon Arts Center the other in Sweden with the AiRs Social Practice Residency of the Skövde Museum. Within  these residencies Melissa will engage in decolonial projects focusing on Indigenous visiting culture and framing conversations as art practice.

    Dawn Biddison

    Curator

    Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center, Alaska Branch

    Dawn Biddison is the Museum Specialist at the Alaska office of the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center. Since 2002, she works with Alaska Native Elders, artists, educators, scholars, culture-bearers and cultural organization staff on collaborative heritage projects, which began with museum exhibition, catalog and website work and continues with community-based cultural heritage documentation, residencies, workshops and public programs and with online educational resources. Examples of this work are available online at the Smithsonian Learning Lab website "Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center in Alaska" and on YouTube at the "Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center Alaska channel."   

    Tessie Naranjo (Santa Clara Pueblo)

    Scholar, Curator, Professor, Language Preservation

    Tessie Naranjo, an enrolled member of the Santa Clara Pueblo, is part of a large extended family. Tessie holds a PhD in Sociology (1992), University of New Mexico. She served as consultant to several museums including the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) (2006), Museum of Indian Arts and Culture (MIAC), Santa Fe (1994, 1996), Heard Museum, Phoenix (1997-1999) and the Poeh Museum, Pojoauqe Pueblo (1991-1993, 2006). Tessie served as Chair of the Native American Graves Protection Act (NAGPRA), 1992-2000.

    As co-Director of the Northern Pueblos Institute, (2005-2010) at Northern New Mexico College, she helped establish the AA and B.A. degree programs in Pueblo Indian Studies and co-taught courses including Pueblo Women’s Studies, Tewa Pueblo Agriculture, Native American Literature, Pueblo Indian Education and Independent Studies. The “Khap’on Tewa Verbs & Pronouns” book completed in 2015 by Tessie, Tito Naranjo, Porter Swentzell and Rina Swentzell was an eight year effort intended for use by Santa Clara community residents wishing to learn Tewa. Tessie has a passion for collecting oral Pueblo memories, loves walking to ancestral Pueblo sites, and continues to do language and cultural work in her Pueblo.

    Eliza Naranjo Morse (Santa Clara Pueblo)

    Artist, Teacher

    Eliza Naranjo Morse is an artist whose work explores aspects of life journey through drawing and sculpture. Informed, inspired and challenged by current events, generational exchange and spiritual existence her work often uses characters, color, land and symbolism to tell stories. Eliza was born in 1980 and grew up on Kha’ P’o land where she lives and works.

    Eliza has shown her work nationally and internationally including: Cumbre de el Tajin (Veracruz, Mexico), Ekaterinburg Museum of Fine Arts (Ekaterinburg, Russia), Chelsea Art Museum (New York, New York), SITE Santa Fe (Santa Fe, New Mexico), Axle Contemporary (Santa Fe, New Mexico), Heard Museum (Phoenix, Arizona), and the Museum of Contemporary Native Art (Santa Fe, New Mexico).

    Ellen Pearlstein

    Professor/Conservator

    UCLA/Getty Graduate Program in the Conservation of Cultural Heritage

    Ellen Pearlstein incorporates Indigenous instruction into graduate conservation education. Ellen is Director of the Andrew W. Mellon Opportunity for Diversity in Conservation, a Keck Prize awardee, and recent recipient of a Rome Prize. She is completing the upcoming Conservation and Stewardship of Indigenous Collections: Changes and Transformations, in the GCI’s Readings in Conservation series.

    Chris Newell (Passamaquoddy)

    Director of Education

    Akomawt Educational Initiative

    Nancy Odegaard, PhD

    Conservator Professor Emerita

    Arizona State Museum, University of Arizona

    Nancy Odegaard served as Conservator, Head of Preservation Division at the Arizona State Museum and Professor of Anthropology, Materials Science & Engineering, Historic Preservation, and American Indian Studies at the University of Arizona from 1983 to 2021. She previously worked at the Smithsonian Institution, Peabody Museum – Harvard University, and with many museums throughout the country and internationally on special projects, conservation assessments, workshops. She has received resident scholar awards from the Fulbright Commission, Getty Conservation Institute, Winterthur Museum, ICCROM- Rome, Canadian Conservation Institute, and University of London as well as receiving an Honorary Doctor of Science from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden in 2016. Among her many publications are books including The Care and Handling of Anthropological Collections (WAAC 1991), Materials Characterization Tests for Objects of Art and Archaeology (Archetype 2000, 2005, Kress Award), Old Poisons – New Problems A Museum Resource (Altamira 2005), Curating Human Remains: A Guide for Museums and Academic Institutions (Altamira 2006, Kress Award), and A Visual Dictionary of Artistic and Domestic Arts (Rowman & Littlefield 2022- American Alliance of Museums Award). She is currently Conservator Professor Emerita at the University of Arizona and continues to research, write, and conduct collaborative projects with museums and communities.

    Tony Chavarria (Santa Clara Pueblo)

    Curator

    Museum of Indian Arts and Culture

    Tony Chavarria (Santa Clara Pueblo) has over 30 years of experience collaborating with tribes and curating Native material culture. As curator of ethnology at the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture in Santa Fe, he has curated many exhibitions including Comic Art Indigene and What’s New in New 2. He served as the Community Liaison and co-curator for the inaugural pueblo exhibition at NMAI and was co-curator for the first Native art exhibition at Epcot Center.

    Mark Fietl

    Senior Program Officer

    Institute of Museum and Library Services

    Mark Feitl is a Senior Program Officer in the Office of Museum Services at the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), where he has worked since 2005. His primary work portfolio includes the administration of the Inspire! Grants for Small Museums, the Native American/Native Hawaiian Museum Services, Save America’s Treasures, and the Museums for America programs, particularly on projects focusing on collections care activities. He also manages the National Medals for Museum Services program. Prior to working at IMLS, he worked for five years at the Smithsonian Institution. He can be reached at mfeitl@imls.gov

  • Establishing and Maintaining Emergency Supply Caches

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    Rachel Onuf from the Vermont Arts & Culture Disaster Resilience Network (VACDARN) and Adrienne Berney from North Carolina's Cultural Resources Emergency Support Team (CREST) will discuss establishing and maintaining supply caches to support regional response efforts.

    Ever wonder what the process of setting up an emergency supply cache entails? Rachel Onuf from the Vermont Arts & Culture Disaster Resilience Network (VACDARN) and Adrienne Berney from North Carolina's Cultural Resources Emergency Support Team (CREST) will discuss establishing and maintaining supply caches to support regional response efforts.

    Rachel Onuf is the Director of the Vermont Historical Records Program, based at the Vermont State Archives & Records Administration, which seeks to improve public access to and engagement with Vermont historical records and to encourage and facilitate collaborative efforts among Vermont historical records repositories. She serves as a co-lead of the Vermont Arts & Culture Disaster and Resilience Network (VACDaRN), a director of the Collections Care & Conservation Alliance, and as a member of the Northeast Document Conservation Center Advisory Committee. 

    Adrienne Berney has coordinated the N.C. Department of Natural & Cultural Resources’ Cultural Resources Emergency Support Team (CREST) since 2015. With a background as an objects curator, she joined DNCR in 2010 as a preservation specialist with the Connecting to Collections project and led regional collections care and disaster preparedness workshops statewide. She currently serves as Outreach Coordinator for the State Archives and continues field services to local history organizations through the Traveling Archivist Program and the Federation of N.C. Historical Societies, in addition to CREST response work.

    Acknowledgements

    Support for this program is provided in part by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

    Rachel Onuf

    Rachel Onuf is the Director of the Vermont Historical Records Program, based at the Vermont State Archives & Records Administration, which seeks to improve public access to and engagement with Vermont historical records and to encourage and facilitate collaborative efforts among Vermont historical records repositories. She serves as a co-lead of the Vermont Arts & Culture Disaster and Resilience Network (VACDaRN), a director of the Collections Care & Conservation Alliance, and as a member of the Northeast Document Conservation Center Advisory Committee. Rachel received her BA from Swarthmore College, an MA in Library and Information Science from the University of Michigan and an MA in American History from the University of Virginia. Past jobs include serving as Roving Archivist for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and Director of Archives at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. She taught as an adjunct for Simmons College School of Library and Information Science and worked as an independent consultant for many years.

  • C2C Care Course: Health and Safety in Collections Care

    Contains 30 Component(s)

    This course will use hazards within collections to introduce participants to the basic principles of occupational health and safety; the role of health and safety regulations; the identification and control of hazards; and planning and implementing risk management strategies.

    Workers in museums and other cultural heritage organizations are exposed to the same occupational hazards as other industries; however, it is our interactions with collections that introduces unique health and safety scenarios where planning for and mitigation to control these situations may be unfamiliar to us, our employers, and often health and safety specialists. 

    This course will use hazards within collections to introduce participants to the basic principles of occupational health and safety; the role of health and safety regulations; the identification and control of hazards; and planning and implementing risk management strategies. 

    Participants can participate in weekly assignments that will culminate in completing a risk management plan for one hazard (or hazardous collection material) that they have identified within their organization. Course content is delivered through previously-recorded Zoom meeting which will allow participants to view lectures and interact with course instructors and discussion leaders through small group breakout rooms. 

    Please note: While understanding the structure of how to deal with issues such COVID-19 will be discussed, this course will not focus on COVID-19 response in collections. 

    Webinar 1: Understanding Hazards in Museums
    A general overview of the principles of occupational health and safety with emphasis on the particular hazards found within museums and other cultural heritage and collecting organizations.

    Webinar 2: Understanding Roles Responsibilities
    An introduction to how federal, state, and local health and safety rules and regulations apply to the workplace and how to identify the proper health and safety professionals to help with issues specific to particular hazards.

    Webinar 3: Risk Assessment 
    A basic introduction to how to identify hazards within the workplace and collections, what exposure means, and how to understand the risk from that exposure.

    Webinar 4 & 5: Risk Management
    An overview of general procedures and policies for the mitigation and control of exposure once hazards have been identified and assessed, includes: proper object handling techniques, selection of personal protective equipment, establishing hazard communication, and understanding waste disposal.

    Webinar 6: Specific Examples
    A lightning round of case studies highlighting collection-specific problems with health and safety in collections care

    This self-study program is presented as a series of recordings of a live course offered July 20th - August 24th, 2021. Please note that any assignments are designed for enrichment only and will not be reviewed.

    Registration Fee: $89

    Our Course Coordinator is Kerith Koss Schrager, Objects Conservator/Owner, The Found Object Art Conservation

    Connecting to Collections Care courses are made possible in part by generous support from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

    Kerith Koss Schraeger (Moderator)

    Founder and Principal Conservator

    Found Object Art Conservation

    Kerith Koss Schrager, objects conservator and owner of The Found Object Art Conservation, provides conservation and preservation services for collections in the greater New York area. As part of her private practice, she regularly publishes and presents on topics relating to health and safety and is currently a graduate student in Environmental Health Sciences at New York University focusing on Occupational and Environmental Hygiene. She is a 2007 graduate of the Conservation Center of the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, where she also serves as adjunct faculty teaching first-year conservation graduate students. She completed her graduate training and internships at the Shelburne Museum, the Field Museum, Brooklyn Museum, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art and participated in the Gulf Coast Recovery Project, assisting with disaster recovery efforts on the Gulf Coast of Mississippi following Hurricane Katrina. Before establishing her conservation practice, she was a Postgraduate Fellow in the Conservation of Museum Collections at the National Museum of Asian Art of the Smithsonian Institution and was the first Andrew W. Mellon Fellow in Objects Conservation and later a project conservator at the Brooklyn Museum. Kerith is a Professional Associate of the American Institute for Conservation and is the Chair Emerita of their Conservators in Private Practice Specialty Group and a former Chair of the Health & Safety Network. 

    Catherine Hawks

    Objects Conservator

    National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian

    Catharine Hawks is an objects conservator with a focus on natural history collections. Before becoming the museum conservator for the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH), she was in private practice for 20 years, working with over 100 institutional clients in the U.S. and abroad. She has overseen or coordinated the work of numerous museum studies and conservation interns, other conservators, and museum staff; treated hundreds of objects and specimens; worked on exhibitions; conducted various risk assessments; developed emergency management plans and aided in emergency salvage and response; consulted on construction/renovation projects; developed collection storage designs; taught workshops and courses; negotiated with suppliers on development and testing of products; served on boards and committees of professional organizations; and wrote or edited papers and texts on conservation and related topics. At the NMNH, she coordinates conservation services throughout the museum, working with building management, collections and exhibitions staff as well as health and safety professionals. She is a Fellow of the International Institute for Conservation, a Professional Associate and former member of the Board of Directors of the American Institute for Conservation, and lead editor for the text, Health and Safety for Museum Professionals.

    Kathryn Makos

    Certified Industrial Hygienist

    Smithsonian (Ret)

    Kathryn Makos, Certified Industrial Hygienist, retired (2013) from the Smithsonian Institution’s Office of Safety, Health and Environmental Management. For 25 years, she was responsible for developing occupational health and safety management programs, conducting exposure risk assessments, and providing safety training to staff in collection care, research laboratories and shops. Ms. Makos has lectured and published widely on topics of environmental hazards unique to museums and cultural institutions and is a co-editor of Health and Safety for Museum Professionals (2012).

    Her 35+ year career included industrial hygiene management positions with the US Department of Energy and the Illinois OSHA On-site Consultation Program. Ms. Makos holds a Master of Public Health from the University of Illinois Chicago and is currently a Research Collaborator with the National Museum of Natural History. She is an Honorary Member of the American Institute for Conservation, a former Chair of their Health and Safety Committee, and a member of the Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. Ms. Makos is an AIHA member and Chair of the AIHA Museum and Cultural Heritage Industry Working Group.

    Brian Bothast

    Safety and Occupational Health Specialist

    Occupational Safety and Health Administration

    Brian Bothast is a Safety and Occupational Health Specialist with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in Peoria, Illinois.  He has worked for Caterpillar in the Environmental, Health, and Safety Department and as an Industrial Hygienist with OSHA. Brian is a 1988 graduate of Illinois State University with a B.S. in Environmental Health.  

    Jeff Sotek

    Senior Associate

    Wood

    Mr . Sotek is a Senior Associate within Wood Environmental & Infrastructure Solutions in Chelmsford, MA office. He is a licensed Professional Engineer, Certified Safety Professional and Certified Industrial Hygienist.  He graduated from WPI with a BS in Civil Engineering and has focused his consulting career on providing advice to clients on EHS consulting and engineering, and environmental due diligence issues.  He routinely provides EHS consulting services to manufacturers, colleges and universities, museums, attorneys, lenders, as well as governmental agencies. Mr. Sotek has also been a guest speaker at numerous seminars and short courses for several associations and corporations. He is also an instructor for PDH online.

    Patricia Silence

    Object Conservator

    Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

    Patricia Silence began her career at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation as Exhibits Conservator in 1999. She is currently the Director of Conservation Operations. Her department may be best known for its specialist conservators, who work in 9 media-specific and analytical labs at the Bruton Heights Wallace Collections and Conservation Building. Prior to 2017, Patty was the Foundation’s first Director of Preventive Conservation and continues to direct 15 collections care professionals, responsible for sites and objects in Colonial Williamsburg’s Historic Area, museums, storage, and on loan to other institutions. Patty works closely with a wide variety of CWF colleagues on construction projects, environmental control systems, fire protection, lighting, and integrated pest management.

    Patty works with collections colleagues all over the world to practice and promote preventive conservation.

    Prior to coming to Williamsburg Patty was a textile conservator at the Textile Conservation Center in Lowell Massachusetts and a conservation technician at the Nelson Atkins Museum of Art.

    Katherine McEnroe

    Associate Conservator of Archaeological Materials

    Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

    Kate McEnroe is the Associate Conservator of Archaeological Materials at the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation, where she has worked for over five years. She worked as a Project Conservator at the Brooklyn Museum after graduating from the University College London’s Institute of Archaeology. Health and safety first became an interest during her Master’s program and it has since expanded, partially inspired by the range of hazardous materials interacted with during archaeological conservation. She is a member of the AIC Health and Safety Network’s leadership team and has recently presented her research on asbestos in historical archaeology.  

    Dennis Ertel

    Health & Safety Inc.

    DennisC. Ertel, Jr, (Denny), is a Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH), CertifiedSafety Specialist (CSP) and Registered Environmental Manager (REM).  Heworks in private practice.  He is a co-editor and chapter author to thetextbook ”Health and Safety for Museum Professionals”, a member of the AIHAMuseums Working Group, a former member of the AIC Health and Safety Committee,and a recipient of the 2008 Special Recognition for Allied Professionals Awardfrom the AIC.

    Paulette Reading

    Conservator

    Paulette Reading has been a textile conservator in private practice in Denver for more than 10 years. She works for museums and other cultural institutions as well as private clients and collectors. She treats a range of objects including flags, quilts, samplers, garments, weavings, and contemporary fiber arts. She has worked on multiple projects for History Colorado, University of Colorado Museum of Natural History, Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, Colorado Springs Pioneers Museum, Denver Art Museum, Molly Brown House, and others.

    Paulette has a graduate degree from the Buffalo State College Art Conservation Department, and an BA in Art History from Washington University in St. Louis. She completed pre-program training at the Textile Conservation Workshop in South Salem, New York where she completed a National Endowment of the Arts Master Internship. She completed graduate internships at the Museum of Natural History of Los Angeles County, the Agora Excavations, Athens, Greece, and the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution. She worked at the Denver Art Museum before beginning her private practice in 2006. Paulette is a Professional Associate Member of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works (AIC) and a member of the Western Associate of Art Conservation (WAAC).

    Christina Dillard

    Environmental Health & Safety Program Manager

    Boston Museum of Science

    Christina Dillard is the Environmental, Health & Safety (EH&S) Program Manager at the Museum of Science in Boston Massachusetts. She has worked at the Museum for 4 years, enjoying the less hectic pace, without the frequent travel her prior role at the Laboratory Safety Institute (LSI) had required allowing her more time with her 2 daughters. For over 20 years she has been dedicated to ensuring safety is an integral and important part of science and science education. She truly enjoys ensuring a safe environment for educators and visitors for informal science education that is high-quality and highly engaging - the Wow without the Ow!  During the course of her career, she has had continued success with biological safety, chemical safety, facility safety programs, and providing safety training programs to all levels of academia, industry and government within North America and abroad. In addition, she has experience with emergency response planning, radiation safety, research compliance coordination, and environmental sustainability.

    Gordon Magenheim

    Christina Cain

    Collections Manager

    Christina has held positions in museum collections preservation for over 22 years at institutions focusing on art, cultural collections, archaeology, and history. She holds a master’s degree in Museum and Field Studies from the University of Colorado, where she is currently the collections manager for anthropology and NAGPRA coordinator at the Museum of Natural History. She also serves as the Emergency Preparedness Chair and Peer Assessor for the Colorado Wyoming Association of Museums and as a task force member of the Colorado Historic and Cultural Resources Emergency Management group.

    Hayley Monroe

    Conservator

    Sonia DeYoung

    Curatorial Associate

    University of Vermont

    Sonia DeYoung is a Curatorial Associate — i.e. a jack-of-all-trades — at the University of Vermont Natural History Museum. Her training is in field ecology, but her long love affair with natural history museums led her to become a passionate advocate for UVM's collections, which lost their historic home to a fire in 2017. She will speak about the recent restoration of UVM's taxidermy collection and the perils of arsenic and mercury involved.

    Lisa Goldberg

    Conservator

    Lisa Goldberg, Goldberg Preservation Services, LLC, is a conservator in private practice with a focus on preventive care as well as health and safety issues. She has been involved in a wide range of conservation consultations and treatment projects to help resolve issues related to exhibit, support and storage, transport and environment for individuals and institutions of many sizes. She is a member of SPNHC and AAM, and is a Fellow of AIC and IIC. As long time editor of the AIC News, she regularly works with authors and various committees to help bring publication projects to fruition. Lisa is one of the founding members of the FAIC website, Storage Techniques for Art, Science, and History Collections (www.STASHc.com) and continues to serve the project as Editor-in-Chief. 

    Barbara Rathburn

    Director of Collections

    Shelburne Museum

    Barbara Rathburn is Director of Collections at Shelburne Museum in Shelburne, Vermont and oversees registration, collections care, loans, exhibition installation, conservation, image rights, and archival management. Previously she was the Registrar and Collections Manager at The Hyde Collection in Glens Falls, New York and prior to that was Associate Registrar at Shelburne Museum. She began her career at Shelburne Museum as a Technician in the conservation lab. Barbara has nearly thirty years of collections care and inventory experience with a wide variety of objects including fine art, textiles, tools, and decorative arts. She received her M.A. in Museum Studies: Decorative Arts/Conservation from the Fashion Institute of Technology.

    Steven Pickman

    Sharon Norquest

    Object Conservator

    Sharon Norquest has a MS in Objects Conservation from the Winterthur University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation. She has a BFA in ceramics with a minor in metal arts. Sharon completed a fellowship at Historic New England and settled in Northern Virginia where she opened a private practice.In private practice for over 10 years, Sharon has completed contracts for various institutions including the National Air and Space Museum and the National Museum of American History. While at the National Air and Space Museum, her work was focused on generating safe handling procedures and the treatment of radioactive objects. Her current work includes treatment of leather objects and outdoor bronze sculptures.

  • Conservation Science Tutorials

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Online course

    With the support of the Getty Foundation, FAIC has created a series of self-paced modules that review key science principles in conservation. The modules are designed to:

    • help mid-career conservators refresh their knowledge
    • prepare participants for workshops on specific topics
    • assist students about to enter a graduate conservation program

    Modules in the series include the following, which may be accessed in any order:

    • Adhesion
    • Analytical techniques
    • Arrhenius equation
    • Color 
    • Enzymes
    • Redox reactions
    • Refraction and reflection
    • Relative humidity
    • Safety in the laboratory
    • Soaps, surfactants, and detergents
    • Statistics
    • Teas chart
    • Weights and measures

    Each tutorial includes suggested readings, which might be helpful to review in advance of beginning the tutorial.

    Registration is FREE, but you must log in to register (if you do not already have an account with F/AIC, you can you create one for free by following the Log In button in the upper right corner.

    The tutorials were researched and written by Sheila Fairbrass Siegler

    Instructional Design by Cyrelle Gerson of Webucate Us

    Project Management by Eric Pourchot

    Special thanks to members of the Association of North American Graduate Programs in Conservation (ANAGPIC) and the AIC Board of Directors for reviewing these materials.

    This project was conceived at a Directors Retreat organized by the Getty Conservation Institute and was developed with grant funding from the Getty Foundation.

    Converted to HTML5 by Avery Bazemore in 2020

  • REopening Archives, Libraries and Museums (REALM): Lessons Learned and Planning for the Future

    Contains 3 Component(s)

    webinar

    As the COVID-19 pandemic has evolved, there have been considerable changes in the operations of archives, libraries and museums. How has the experience impacted your short and long-term planning approach? Will you think differently about future operational challenges? From isolating and handling materials, to developing staff and visitor policies, the impacts have been far-reaching and required considerable adaptability and communication. This session will provide the opportunity to hear from members of the REopening Archives, Libraries and Museums (REALM) project team, and the Northeast Document Conservation Center, as well as from your colleagues with similar experiences. The panelists will share information about the REALM project, including freely available resources to support local decision-making.

    REopening Archives, Libraries, and Museums (REALM) is a research project conducted by OCLC, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, and Battelle to produce and distribute science-based COVID-19 information that can aid local decision making regarding operations of archives, libraries, and museums.

    This program will use the Zoom webinars platform. Automatic captioning provided.

    Presenters

    Bexx Caswell-Olson, Director of Book Conservation, Northeast Document Conservation Center; Anna Musun-Miller, REALM Toolkit Editor, Museums, OCLC; and Kendra Morgan, Senior Program Manager, OCLC

    Bexx Caswell-Olson, Director of Book Conservation, Northeast Document Conservation Center

    Bexx Caswell-Olson is the Director of Book Conservation at the Northeast Document Conservation Center, where she manages a team of talented book conservators.  She is a Professional Associate of the American Institute for Conservation and the President of the Guild of Book Workers.

    Anna Musun-Miller, REALM Toolkit Editor, Museums, OCLC

    During her 14-year museum career, Anna Musun-Miller has worked for cultural attractions large and small, covering topics from wildlife to the Wild West. She is focused on providing practical, useful resources for museum staff in her role as Toolkit Editor, Museums for the REALM project.

    Kendra Morgan, Senior Program Manager, OCLC

    Kendra Morgan is a senior program manager at OCLC, supporting the REopening Archives, Libraries and Museums (REALM) project. She is particularly interested in the role libraries and museums play in supporting healthy communities, and has managed a number of grant-funded programs that address those issues.  

    Bexx Caswell-Olson

    Director of Book Conservation

    Northeast Document Conservation Center

    Bexx Caswell-Olson is theDirector of Book Conservation at the Northeast Document Conservation Center,where she manages a team of talented book conservators.  She is aProfessional Associate of the American Institute for Conservation and thePresident of the Guild of Bookworkers. 

    Anna Musun-Miller

    REALM Toolkit Editor, Museums, OCLC

    OCLC

    During her 14-year museum career,Anna Musun-Miller has worked for cultural attractions large and small, coveringtopics from wildlife to the Wild West. She is focused on providing practical,useful resources for museum staff in her role as Toolkit Editor, Museums forthe REALM project.

    Kendra Morgan

    Senior Program Manager

    OCLC

    Kendra Morgan is a senior programmanager at OCLC, supporting the REopeningArchives, Libraries and Museums (REALM) project. She isparticularly interested in the role libraries and museums play in supportinghealthy communities, and has managed a number of grant-funded programs thataddress those issues.  

  • 2021 AIC/SPNHC Joint Virtual Annual Meeting

    Contains 118 Product(s)

    Virtual Annual Meeting - May 10 - June 24, 2021

    Transform 2021

    AIC/SPNHC Joint Virtual Meeting

    Dates

    • May 3-7, 2021 (Pre-sessions and Workshops)
    • May 10 to June 24, 2021  (Main Conference)

    Program & Schedule

    We have grouped sessions into subject modules, which we will present in Zoom (with automated closed captioning). For more information about the meeting theme, structure and schedule of sessions, see Program & Schedule.

    Joint Meeting

    We are pleased to be holding a joint annual meeting with the Society for Preservation of Natural History Collections (SPNHC) whose members can read through our Guide to SPNHC Sessions.

    Virtual Meeting

    With the most positive vaccine projections having the majority of US residents vaccinated by early summer, our in-person meeting in early May would have still been unsafe, so we opted for a virtual meeting in 2021 and moved our commitment with the Hyatt Regency Jacksonville from 2021 to the 51st Annual Meeting in 2023.

    Registration

    Registration for the 2021 AIC/SPNHC Joint Virtual Annual Meeting is open! All registrations are full registrations that include all sessions and access to the recordings. If you are new user, create an account (free) and then log in to register for the meeting or submit the form below. See instructions below for more information.

    image Registration Form

    image New User Registration Instructions

    Rates

    Member dues must be paid in full by January 31st of the calendar year in which the meeting takes place to receive the member rate. You have to log in to this site to register at the early rates and use the discount codes.

    Registration Rates
    Member - $175
    Non-Member - $205
    Speaker - $125
    Student and Post-graduate Members - $105

    • SPNHC Members: Use Discount Code SPNHC at checkout to receive the member rate/ SPNHC Student Members: Use the code SPNHCstudent 
    • Speakers: AIC Members use 2021Speaker, Non-AIC members use 2021SpeakerNM
    • AIC Student and Post-graduate Members: Use STUDENT21(student rates are for student members). 
    • Non-member Students: use the code nonmemberstudent

    Administrative & Group Registrations

    If you need to register someone other than yourself or a group of people, please use the form or instructions below. If you wan to register 10 or more people, email us for a bulk registration discount and streamlined processing at meetings@culturalheritage.org

    image Registration Form

    image Instructions for Registering Another Individual

    Rollover Registrations

    If you registered for the 2020 Annual Meeting and chose to roll over your registration to an in-person meeting, you had the option to select rollover to 2021 or 2022. See below for details on how this will work now that the 2021 meeting is virtual.

    Option 1 (default): Your 2020 meeting registration will be rolled over to 2022, so you can use it at our next in-person meeting, the 2022 Annual Meeting in Los Angeles. You will need to register for the 2021 virtual meeting separately. The 2021 AIC/SPNHC Joint Virtual Meeting is less expensive than an in-person AIC Annual Meeting with early registration at $125 for regular members and $75 for student members. You do not have to do anything to receive Option 1. If we do not hear from you by June 15, we will automatically roll your registration over to 2022. 

    Option 2: You can use your 2020 rollover registration to register for the 2021 AIC/SPNHC Joint Virtual Meeting. It will be a one to one trade. As a thank you, you will receive a 30% discount off registration rates for the 2022 or 2023 Annual Meeting. Email meetings@culturalheritage.org to use Option 2 or if you have any questions. 

    Refunds

    Our refund policy attempts to balance the needs of being compassionate and flexible with members who find at the last minute that they can no longer attend the meeting with the need to keep registration rates as low as possible for all members.

    More information

    Attendees Assisting Attendees Campaign

    As we plan and create the 2021 AIC/SPNHC Joint Virtual Annual Meeting, we recognize that some of our colleagues are experiencing financial hardship at a time when we most need to feel a connection to our community. We strive to create as many opportunities as possible to assist with registration fees, and many of our members have offered to contribute to these efforts. If you are in a position to do so, please consider supporting your colleagues by contributing to this campaign.

    More information

    Exhibitors

    We are accepting exhibitor registrations for our virtual meeting  Connect with your best customers in our virtual exhibit hall. 

    For more details, pricing, and a registration packet, please email meetings@culturalheritage.org.

  • Equity and Inclusion July 2021 Meet & Greet

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Join the Equity & Inclusion Committee for a "Meet and Greet". Please bring your questions and feedback and learn more about our upcoming initiatives.

    Join the Equity & Inclusion Committee for a "Meet and Greet". Please bring your questions and feedback and learn more about our upcoming initiatives.

  • Photographic Materials Group (PMG) Business Meeting

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Photographic Materials Group (PMG) Business Meeting

  • Emergency Planning and Response, Texas-Style

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    Texas Collections Emergency Resource Alliance (TX-CERA) and the Houston Arts Alliance Response to Polar Vortex Uri, February 2021.

    Texas Collections Emergency Resource Alliance (TX-CERA) and the Houston Arts Alliance Response to Polar Vortex Uri, February 2021. 

    Olivia Primanis

    Olivia Primanis received her training through an apprenticeship in hand book binding and book conservation beginning in 1974 with Jean Gunner at Hunt Botanical Library, Carnegie Mellon University, in Pittsburgh. Pa. In 1975 she founded and was the sole proprietor of "The Bookbinder" that offered artists' supplies, hand bookbinding (for area institutions such as the University of Pittsburgh Rare Book Collections) and classes in hand book binding. In 1984 she moved to Los Angeles, CA where she taught book conservation and consulted for area institutions, including The Clark Library (UCLA); Scripps College (Claremont) and the Getty Center and Museum. Following the L.A. Public Library fire, she consulted with Solex Inc on the drying of 160,000 books. From 1990 until January 2019, she held the position of Head of the Book Lab (Senior Conservator since 1991) at the Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin, where she performed conservation treatments, trained staff and interns, lectured, and participated in the administration of the Conservation Department. At this time, she is consulting on library preservation, performing book conservation treatments in her private business and, as a founding member, taking an active role in the activities of Texas Collections Emergency Response Alliance (TX-CERA).

    Lauren Hainley

    Houston Arts Alliance

    Lauren Hainley is the Director, Disaster Service at the Houston Arts Alliance where she ensures that the Houston area arts, culture, and historic preservation communities are ready and resilient in the face of disaster. Lauren received a BA in Theater from Hendrix College and an MA in Arts Leadership from the University of Houston. Lauren has been active in the Houston theater community as an actor, stage manager, and director since 1992.  Find out more about Lauren, her work, and her projects at laurenhainley.com