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  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live In-Person Event on 06/13/2022 at 9:00 AM (EDT)

    June 13 - 16, 2022, New York, NY

    June 13 - 16, 2022
    New York, NY
    Organizers: Lee Ann Daffner and Krista Lough

    Large contemporary photographs are found in both public and private collections as artists continue to work at this scale, responding to innovations in the printing and the advertising industry. This workshop will focus on the unique challenges in the presentation, display, and collection care of these large-scale works, with the goal of providing a forum to share information on their care and preservation. Conservators, curators, and collections specialists will outline a range of preservation concerns; artists will share their creative experiences and perspectives creating these works. Market forces in the contemporary photography art world will be touched on. Participants will see first-hand the exhibition and storage, and hear conservation concerns for large works in an institutional setting.

    Categories of oversize photographs will be discussed throughout the program, such as photographs that follow traditional framed and glazed presentation styles, including certain face-mounted works; photographs that are mounted and presented with a more minimal aesthetic without frames or glazing; and photographs with unconventional presentation styles, such as wallpapers, installations, light boxes, and those which lean against the wall, are secured with tapes, clips or magnets.

    The workshop will cover topics including artistic practice, collection care and methods of display. Procedures and protocols surrounding the acquisition, exhibition, handling, shipping, and storage of large works will be considered. Presentations will also cover a range of conservation issues and damages related to (and often unique to) these vulnerable photographs.

    The practical, hands-on sections of the workshop will focus on handling mounted and unsupported large materials, including rolling for storage. In addition, we will touch on surface cleaning and review mount materials. Participants will tour a printing and mounting studio that produces large-scale works and the museum’s off-site storage facility.

    This workshop is geared toward conservation and collection care professionals responsible for the care of large-format photographs. Click on the "Apply to Participate" tab above to learn more. The registration fee is $699 for AIC members and $839 for non-members. The registration fee is due after applicants have been notified of their acceptance to the workshop. Scholarships are available to help support participation in this workshop (more information can be found in the "Apply to Participate" tab). FAIC is closely monitoring the COVID-19 situation. We hope to be able to move forward with the workshop in June and encourage you to apply to participate. The situation will be reevaluated prior to notifications being made to applicants. View our Help page for our cancellation policy.


    Funding for this program comes from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation fund for Collaborative Workshops in Photograph Conservation and a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. Additional funding comes from the Foundation for Advancement in Conservation (FAIC) Endowment for Professional Development, which was created by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and is supported by donations from members of the American Institute for Conservation (AIC) and its friends. Workshops are made possible with the assistance of many AIC members, but no AIC membership dues were used to create or present this course.

    FAIC relies on your contributions to support these and its many other programs. Learn more about donating to the foundation.

    Interested individuals must complete an application. Each potential participant will be asked to describe their relationship with large format photographs and how they would use and share the knowledge gained from this workshop with others. Priority will go to conservation and collection care professionals who will be working with large format photographs immediately following this workshop (if not already). Geographic diversity will also be considered.

    Applications are due February 10, 2022. Submit an application by clicking the "Apply" button below. Applications are submitted through our online application portal. When you enter the portal, you will be prompted to login to the system using a login ID and password. If you already have an account (this should be the case if you are an AIC member or have participated in an AIC or FAIC program), use the same login information you use to access that account. If you do not have an account in the system, you can quickly set one up before you begin your application. Notifications will by made by March 11, 2022. 

    FAIC is closely monitoring the COVID-19 situation. We hope to be able to move forward with the workshops in June and encourage you to apply to participate. The situation will be reevaluated in March prior to the notifications being made to applicants.

    APPLY


    Scholarships are available to support participation in this program. Scholarship applications are due on February 15, 2022, and must be submitted separate from the workshop application. If you anticipate needing support to attend this workshop, please apply by the deadline even if you haven't yet been accepted to the workshop.

    FAIC/NEH Individual Professional Development Scholarships support participants offer up to $1,500 to help defray costs associated with participation in this workshop for residents of the United States.

    FAIC/Mellon Photograph Workshop Professional Development Scholarships offer up to $1,000, plus waiver of registration fees, to help defray costs associated with participation in this for international attendees.

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  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live In-Person Event on 06/08/2022 at 9:00 AM (EDT)

    June 8 - 10, 2022, Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH

    June 8 - 10, 2022
    Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, OH
    Instructors: 
    Patricia Wilson Nguyen and Robin Hanson

    Documenting the fibers and fabrication techniques of textiles is an important contribution conservation professionals make to the body of knowledge about a work of art. In addition to documenting the weave structure of a textile, documenting the materials from which a textile is fabricated also is key. This workshop will focus on a common component of textiles—metal thread. Collections worldwide include textiles with metal thread. Textile conservators with collections focused on Eurasian and American textiles frequently encounter this material. Used by many cultures, metal thread can be incorporated during the process of weaving a textile on a loom or added manually (by hand) or mechanically to a woven fabric as a surface decoration.

    The oldest known metal thread, found in a Macedonian tomb and dating from the 4th century B.C., was a narrow strip of foil cut from a sheet of hammered gold. Metal thread can also be produced as a wire, round in cross section, and “drawn” through successively smaller holes to reach the desired diameter. Metal leaf can be adhered to paper or animal membrane and then cut into thin strips. Once created, these forms of metal thread can be wound around a silk core or around an internal form to create a spiral without a core. Metal leaf also can be applied with a resin or adhesive to a woven textile.

    As metals age they become work-hardened, brittle and oxidized. This is true of metal thread as well. The aging characteristics of metal thread will be emphasized in this workshop; opportunities for close looking also will be provided in order that participants gain an understanding of metal thread degradation patterns. Instrumental analysis as a tool for conservators to confirm historical information regarding metal thread also will be discussed.

    The workshop will highlight the materiality of metal thread, providing workshop participants with practical experience working with various forms of metal thread to gain an understanding of how the material behaves and the tools necessary to apply it to a textile. The workshop will combine lectures on the history of metal thread in textiles, their manufacture, and their analysis. Workshop participants will spend time in the first-hand examination of textiles in Cleveland’s encyclopedic collection containing metal thread.

    Rarely do conservation professionals have the opportunity to work with metal thread to fully understand changes to its physical and chemical properties over time. During this workshop, time will be dedicated to the materiality of metal thread and the hands-on experience of working with it. It is expected that both the looking and the doing components will provide the catalyst for on-going discussions over the three days among workshop leaders and participants. Participants will take away samples of various types of metal thread and the metal thread worked on textile substrates to form the beginnings of a “reference library.”

    FAIC and the Cleveland Museum of Art are closely monitoring the COVID-19 situation. We hope to be able to move forward with the workshop in June and encourage you register. The situation will be reevaluated in the months leading up to the workshop. Workshop participants should be vaccinated and must wear a KN95 mask that will provided. View our Help page for our cancellation policy.


    Funding for this program comes from the Foundation for Advancement in Conservation (FAIC) Endowment for Professional Development and a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The FAIC Endowment for Professional Development, which was created by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and is supported by donations from members of the American Institute for Conservation (AIC) and its friends. Workshops are made possible with the assistance of many AIC members, but no AIC membership dues were used to create or present this course.

    FAIC relies on your contributions to support these and its many other programs. Learn more about donating to the foundation.

    Scholarships are available to support participation in this program. Scholarship applications are due on February 15, 2022. If you anticipate needing support to attend this workshop, please apply by the deadline.

    FAIC/NEH Individual Professional Development Scholarships support participants offer up to $1,500 to help defray costs associated with participation in this workshop for residents of the United States.

    Robin Hanson

    Associate Conservator of Textiles

    Cleveland Museum of Art

    Robin Hanson has managed the textile conservation lab at the Cleveland Museum of Art for the past 22 years. CMA’s textile collection, numbering about 5,000 textiles, mirrors the museum’s permanent collection—it is an encyclopedic one covering Egyptian mummy linen to contemporary fiber art. In 1997 Robin completed graduate training in conservation, with a specialization in textiles, at the Winterthur / University of Delaware Program in Art Conservation. She also serves as associate editor for textiles for the peer-reviewed journal, Journal of the American Institute for Conservation. Since 2015 she has served as field editor for textiles for AATA Online: Abstracts of International Conservation Literature, a compendium of 150,000 abstracts hosted by the Getty Conservation Institute. 

    Patricia Wilson Nguyen

    PhD metallurgist and MIT-trained engineer, specialist in 17th century embroidery

    Thistle Threads

  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 02/23/2022 at 7:45 AM (EST)

    Online, February 18 - April 27 with live sessions on Wednesdays at 12:00-1:00 p.m. ET, instructed by Jennifer McGlinchey Sexton

    Online, February 18 - April 27 with live sessions on Wednesdays at 12:00-1:00 p.m. ET
    Instructor: Jennifer McGlinchey Sexton

    Learn the ins and outs of UV-visible fluorescence photography for collections. Participants of this workshop will gain an understanding of capturing UV-visible fluorescence images for use in conservation, including common applications, safety, and variables specific to UV techniques. Content will cover practical tools such as lamps, filters, background materials, and standardization targets, to aid in the evaluation and maintenance of equipment. Participants will be guided and encouraged to practice consistent workflows, capture, and evaluation of images.

    Pre-recorded lectures will be released weekly. Lectures will be supplemented with assignments and weekly live office hours. It is recommended that participants have access to a documentation studio to practice the imaging techniques, but this is not required. Equipment and supply lists will be provided for those wishing to purchase new equipment. Participants should expect to send about 1.5 hours per week on this course.

    This course is for conservation professionals, students, collections managers, photographers, or anyone looking for more in-depth information on using this technique. The live sessions for the course will take place in Zoom and automated captions will be available.

    Jennifer McGlinchey Sexton

    Jennifer McGlinchey Sexton is a conservator in private practice in Colorado. She specializes in photographs, works on paper and conservation imaging. She serves museums, institutions, and private individuals in the West and throughout the United States. A member of Mountain States Art Conservation, she works in collaboration with conservators of varied specialties whenever possible. Trained as a fine-art photographer, Jennifer became interested in conservation through exploration of historic photographic processes. Her graduate training at Buffalo State College allowed her to explore additional aspects of photography as a medium and a tool for conservation. She gained experience as a conservator and photographer in positions at MFA, Houston, Williamstown Art Conservation Center, the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Detroit Institute of Arts, the Buffalo Bill Center of the West, the Menil Collection, and Paul Messier LLC. For the 2019-2020 academic year, was a full-time lecturer for “Technical Examination and Documentation” at the Garman Art Conservation Department, Buffalo State College.

  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 02/11/2022 at 1:00 PM (EST)

    Come join the AIC Sustainability Committee as we speak with Kelly Krish, Preventive Conservation Specialist at the Image Permanence Institute about all things energy savings. Kelly has worked extensively at institutions across the country to use energy saving strategies not only to help reach sustainability goals, but also to actually better preserve cultural heritage than traditional methods. She will share takeaways from IPI’s research and her experience in implementing them including best practices for HVACs, microclimates, air flow, lighting, passive storage (and more)! Bring your questions for Kelly or send them ahead of time to aicsustainability@gmail.com. Further resources can be found at: Webinars: https://www.imagepermanenceinstitute.org/education/webinars.html Publications: https://www.imagepermanenceinstitute.org/education/publications.html (the first one is the Methodology, and can be downloaded for free in its entirety or in sections) AAM blog post on microclimates: https://www.aam-us.org/2021/07/21/microclimates-a-greener-future-for-collection-care/

    Come join the AIC Sustainability Committee as we speak with Kelly Krish, Preventive Conservation Specialist at the Image Permanence Institute about all things energy savings. Kelly has worked extensively at institutions across the country to use energy saving strategies not only to help reach sustainability goals, but also to actually better preserve cultural heritage than traditional methods. She will share takeaways from IPI’s research and her experience in implementing them including best practices for HVACs, microclimates, air flow, lighting, passive storage (and more)! Bring your questions for Kelly or send them ahead of time to aicsustainability@gmail.com. Further resources can be found at: 

    Webinars: https://www.imagepermanenceins...

    Publications: https://www.imagepermanenceins... (the first one is the Methodology, and can be downloaded for free in its entirety or in sections)

    AAM blog post on microclimates: https://www.aam-us.org/2021/07...

    Kelly Krish

    Kelly McCauley Krish joined IPI in 2016 as the Preventive Conservation Specialist, wherein she provides information and guidance on preventive conservation, particularly best practices for sustainable environmental management through outreach and consulting projects at a range of cultural institutions. Her current research interests include pollution monitoring and mold prevention, and she is involved in the development of research projects to address these and other needs of the field. Kelly has a MSc in Art Conservation from the University of Delaware. She recently became a LEED Green Associate and has received RIT’s Rebecca Johnson Sustainability Champion Award in recognition of her sustainability efforts. 

  • Contains 2 Component(s) Includes Multiple Live Events. The next is on 02/03/2022 at 4:00 PM (EST)

    CAN! Reading Group

  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 02/02/2022 at 2:00 PM (EST)

    Nicole Sheley, Director of NS International, will speak about insurance considerations cultural institutions should be aware of after disasters.

    Nicole Sheley, Director of NS International, will speak about insurance considerations cultural institutions should be aware of after disasters. 

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    CAN! Conversations, Winter 2021

    CAN! Conversations is a series of discussions on the quandaries of conserving contemporary art. Topics are proposed by CAN! members for CAN! members and the events will be held seasonally over Zoom. Do you have a topic to propose for a future CAN! Conversation? Send your ideas to Martha Singer at martha@materialwhisperer.com.

    Pam Paulson

    Founder and Master Printer

    Paulson Fontaine Press

    Instagram: @paulsonfontainepress 

    Website: paulsonfontainepress.com

    Paul Amaral

    President and Founder

    Amaral Custom Fabricators

    Instagram: @amaralcf

    Website: amaralcf.com

    Matt Dilling

    Co-Founder and Creative Director

    Lite Brite Neon Studio

    Instagram: @litebriteneon 

    Website: litebriteneon.com

    Taylor Healy

    Conservation Fellow

    Smithsonian Institute

    Today's discussion will be moderated by Taylor Healy.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    A series of discussion about the conservation of contemporary art.

    CAN! Conversations is a new discussion series on the quandaries of conserving contemporary art. Topics are proposed by CAN! members for CAN! Members and will be held seasonally over Zoom.  Do you have a topic to propose for a future CAN! Conversation? Please send ideas to Martha Singer martha@materialwhisperer.com

    Joy Bloser

    Assistant Objects Conservator

    The Menil Collection

    Objects conservator specializing in modern and contemporary art with a particular interest in plastics.

    Julia Betancor

    Head Conservation

    Julia Betancor Fine Art Conservation

    Julia Betancor is the founder of Julia Betancor Fine Art Conservation, Madrid. She is also Head of Conservation at Head Conservation at Colección SOLO. She studied easel painting conservation at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid. She is currently a conservator in private practice with over 20 years broad experience in all aspects of conservation. She has also had the pleasure of working as a fine art assessor and appraiser for insurance companies and the courts. She is the founder at ARTY and Co, a fine art consultation service. 

    From 1996 to 2008, she was Senior Curator of Paintings at Hamish Dewar LTD. She was a painting conservator at the Royal Palace of Madrid from 2002-2004. She was a fellow in paintings at the Museo de Arte Reina Sofia (Madrid) from 1995-96. She studied Materials for Conservation at the University of London in 1996 and conservation at the Conservazione e Restauro dei Beni Culturali (Palazzo Spinelli) in 1990.

    She is a long-time member of ICOM, RSA, AIC, and IIC.

    Miroslaw Wachowiak

    Associate Professor/Conservator

    Nicolaus Copernicus University/Centre of Contemporary Art, Toruń

    Miroslaw Wachowiak since 2012 works as associate professor at the Department of Conservation and Restoration of Modern and Contemporary Art of Nicolaus Copernicus University in Torun and since 2008 as conservator at the Centre of Contemporary Art. He was researching Polish 19th c. paintings. At the moment his main interested is focused on modern and contemporary art materials and techniques as well as ethics in conservation, especially considering interaction with artist also of conceptual and performative attitude. He is coauthor of book: Issues of Conservation and Restoration of Modern and Contemporary Art and author of just published in Poland: Intervention of Conservator Into the works of the Lliving Artists. Ethical and Conservation Issues. Since 2016 he is the Deputy Dean of Fine Art Faculty NCU in Torun.

    Mareike Opeña

    Associate Conservator

    Contemporary Conservation Ltd

    Mareike Opeña graduated from the Cologne Institute of Conservation Sciences, Germany in 2009 with a Diplom thesis on physical properties of polymeric films, and a Master thesis on ethics and multiculturalism in conservation of contemporary art in 2017. 

    Mareike joined Contemporary Conservation in 2010, where she has specialized in materials such as intestines, rose petals, leafing pigments, and matte spray-painted or monochrome surfaces. She is co-founding member of AIC’s Contemporary Art Network (CAN!) and served as Program Chair and Assistant Program Chair for AIC’s Annual Meetings in 2019 and 2020. 

    Since 2019 she is researching contemporary art conservation in private practice as an external PhD candidate under supervision of  Dr. Vivian van Saaze, at the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Maastricht University, NL.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Learn about the Holly Maxson Conservation Grants, discuss project ideas, and ask your questions about this new funding opportunity!

    The Foundation for Advancement in Conservation (FAIC) offers awards for the implementation of Holly Maxson Conservation Grants.

    The grants are designed to build awareness among students (middle school through undergraduate) about conservation and related fields and to encourage students to consider the field of conservation as a career path. A broad range of projects might be proposed, such as curriculum development, online resources, pilot projects within an institution, or video production. Two or more awards will be given every two years. A total of $32,000 will be awarded, with a maximum award amount of $16,000, in 2022.

    Join us for an information session to discuss grant guidelines, eligibility, and prospective projects, and have the opportunity to ask any questions about project scope. 

    This event will take place on Wednesday, November 17th at 3 PM ET/12 PM PT.

    The session will be recorded and available after the live event.

    We look forward to seeing you!

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Join us on Wednesday 3rd November, 11.00 PDT, 14.00 EDT, 18.00 GMT to learn what fellow cultural heritage professionals are doing to minimize their negative impact. In this free virtual event, committee members will be joined by conservation and collections professionals from around the world who will explain how they have altered their practices to be more sustainable.

    Please join AIC’s Sustainability Committee and Icon’s Environmental Sustainability Network for our inaugural collaboration in honor of COP26 and in celebration of the world’s commitment to fighting climate change. We recognize that to tackle the climate crisis we need not only expertise, but work from all of us.
    Join us on Wednesday 3rd November, 11.00 PDT, 14.00 EDT, 18.00 GMT to learn what fellow cultural heritage professionals are doing to minimize their negative impact. In this free virtual event, committee members will be joined by conservation and collections professionals from around the world who will explain how they have altered their practices to be more sustainable. Our panelists will share their experiences of:
    • working towards becoming carbon neutral while maintaining 20% RH
    • rethinking the products used during historic house maintenance
    • achieving certified B corp status at an independent paintings conservation studio
    • how our field can rethink our work and expand our focus to include sustainability as art preservation. 

    Please send your questions to us beforehand: sustainability@culturalheritage.org and sustainability.icon@gmail.com